[Home] [Infertility Library] [Fertility Videos] [Fertility Experts On Call] [About The Book] [Fertility Store: Ovulation Testing: Fertility Testing] [Fertility Pregnancy News] [Contact Us] [Fertility Expert Directory] [Advertise on Getting Pregnant Now] [About Getting Pregnant Now]
www.GettingPregnantNow.org
Getting Pregnant: Fertility:pregnancy
GettingPregnantNow.org
The Trusted Fertility Source  helping couples get pregnant for over 20 years!
common causes of female infertility

Common
Causes of
Female
Infertility:
The Lifestyle Factors






Information courtesy of Standford University
 
 
www.GettingPregnantNow.org


    Diet and Exercise


    Optimal reproductive functioning requires both proper diet and appropriate levels of exercise.  Women who are significantly overweight or underweight may have difficulty becoming pregnant.
    
    Smoking

   
Cigarette smoking has been shown to lower sperm counts in men and increases the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, and low-birth-weight babies for women.  Smoking by either partner reduces the chance of conceiving with each cycle, either naturally or by IVF, by one-third.

    
    Alcohol

    Alcohol intake greatly increases the risk of birth defects for women and, if in high enough levels in the motherís blood, may cause Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.  Alcohol also affects sperm counts in men.
    
    Drugs

    Drugs, such as marijuana and anabolic steroids, may impact sperm counts in men.  Cocaine use in pregnant women may cause severe retardations and kidney problems in the baby and is perhaps the worst possible drug to abuse while pregnant. Recreational drug use should be avoided, both when trying to conceive and when pregnant.

  Environmental and Occupational Factors:
       The ability to conceive may be affected by exposure to various toxins or chemicals in the workplace or the surrounding
       environment.  Substances that can cause mutations, birth defects, abortions, infertility or sterility are called reproductive

       toxins.  Disorders of infertility, reproduction, spontaneous abortion, and teratogenesis are among the top ten work-related
       diseases and injuries in the U.S. today.  Despite the fact that considerable controversy exists regarding the impacts of
       toxins on fertility, four chemicals are now being regulated based on their documented infringements on conception.

    Lead

    Exposure to lead sources has been proven to negatively impact fertility in humans.  Lead can produce teratospermias (abnormal sperm) and is thought to be an abortifacient, or substance that causes artificial abortion.
    
    Medical Treatments and Materials


    Repeated exposure to radiation, ranging from simple x-rays to chemotherapy, has been shown to alter sperm production, as well as contribute to a wide array of ovarian problems.
    
    Ethylene Oxide


    A chemical used both in the sterilization of surgical instruments and in the manufacturing of certain pesticides, ethylene oxide may cause birth defects in early pregnancy and has the potential to provoke early miscarriage.
   
    Dibromochloropropane (DBCP)


    Handling the chemicals found in pesticides, such as DBCP, can cause ovarian problems, leading to a variety of health conditions, like early menopause, that may directly impact fertility.

Lifestyle Factors Linked To Female Infertility

  It is well-known that certain personal habits and lifestyle factors impact health; many of these same factors may limit a  couple's ability to conceive.  Fortunately, however, many of these variables can be regulated to increase not only the  chances of conceiving but also one's overall health.